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Big Data

The Next Data Revolution is Here – AI Will Understand What Isn’t Being Said

In this special guest feature, Ran Margaliot, COO and VP R&D for Affogata, discusses how nalyzing and sorting through unstructured data saves countless hours and recognizes patterns in seconds that even skilled data professionals may never uncover. That data “superpower” can lead to better products that adapt in real-time, responsive customer service,  and a sharing of insights across an organization magnifies its impact even further. The impact is well-demonstrated, and there is plenty of data and case studies to prove it; the final step is for human decision-makers to make the decision sooner rather than later.
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Making Android more accessible for braille users
Big Data Diversity, Equity and Inclusion

Making Android more accessible for braille users

Editor’s note: Today is Global Accessibility Awareness Day, and we’ll be sharing more on how we’re partnering with people with disabilitiesand what we’re doing to make education more accessible.The heart of our mission at Google is making the world’s information truly accessible. But the reality is we can only realize this mission with the help of the community. This year at I/O, we announced one more step in the right direction, thanks to feedback and help from our users: We’re making it easier for braille readers to use Android. Available in our next Android 13 Beta in a few weeks, we are beginning to build out-of-the-box support for braille displays in Talkback, our screen reader within Android.A refreshable braille display is an electro-mechanical device that creates braille patterns by raising rounded pins through holes in a flat surface. Braille-literate computer users use the braille display to touch-read braille dots representing text. With the display, you can also type out braille. These devices help people with deafblindness access mobile phones and people with blindness use their phones silently. Previously, people connected their Android devices to braille displays using the BrailleBack app, which required a separate download from the Play Store, or used a virtual keyboard within Talkback instead of a physical device.With this new update, there are no additional downloads necessary to use most braille displays. People can use braille displays to access many of the same features available with Talkback. For instance, you can use display buttons to navigate your screen and then do activities like compose an email, make a phone call, send a text message or read a book.There are also new shortcuts that make it easier to use braille displays with Talkback. Now there are shortcuts for navigating so it’s easier to scroll and move to the next character, word or line. There are also shortcuts for settings and for editing, like jumping to the end of documents or selecting, copying and pasting.You can sign up for the Android beta program to try out Talkback 13 in the next beta release.We are grateful to the community for their ongoing feedback that makes features like these possible. This is just the first step forward in developing this integration, and we can’t wait to do even more to expand the feature and to create even more related capabilities.
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How we build with and for people with disabilities
Big Data Diversity, Equity and Inclusion

How we build with and for people with disabilities

Editor’s note: Today is Global Accessibility Awareness Day. We’re also sharing how we’re making education more accessibleand launching a newAndroid accessibility feature.Over the past nine years, my job has focused on building accessible products and supporting Googlers with disabilities. Along the way, I’ve been constantly reminded of how vast and diverse the disability community is, and how important it is to continue working alongside this community to build technology and solutions that are truly helpful.Before delving into some of the accessibility features our teams have been building, I want to share how we’re working to be more inclusive of people with disabilities to create more accessible tools overall.Nothing about us, without usIn the disability community, people often say “nothing about us without us.” It’s a sentiment that I find sums up what disability inclusion means. The types of barriers that people with disabilities face in society vary depending on who they are, where they live and what resources they have access to. No one’s experience is universal. That’s why it’s essential to include a wide array of people with disabilities at every stage of the development process for any of our accessibility products, initiatives or programs.We need to work to make sure our teams at Google are reflective of the people we’re building for. To do so, last year we launched our hiring site geared toward people with disabilities — including our Autism Career Program to further grow and strengthen our autistic community. Most recently, we helped launch the Neurodiversity Career Connector along with other companies to create a job portal that connects neurodiverse candidates to companies that are committed to hiring more inclusively.Beyond our internal communities, we also must partner with communities outside of Google so we can learn what is truly useful to different groups and parlay that understanding into the improvement of current products or the creation of new ones. Those partnerships have resulted in the creation of Project Relate, a communication tool for people with speech impairments, the development of a completely new TalkBack, Android’s built-in screen reader, and the improvement of Select-to-Speak, a Chromebook tool that lets you hear selected text on your screen spoken out loud.Equitable experiences for everyoneEngaging and listening to these communities — inside and outside of Google — make it possible to create tools and features like the ones we’re sharing today.The ability to add alt-text, which is a short description of an image that is read aloud by screen readers, directly to images sent through Gmail starts rolling out today. With this update, people who use screen readers will know what’s being sent to them, whether it’s a GIF celebrating the end of the week or a screenshot of an important graph.Communication tools that are inclusive of everyone are especially important as teams have shifted to fully virtual or hybrid meetings. Again, everyone experiences these changes differently. We’ve heard from some people who are deaf or hard of hearing, that this shift has made it easier to identify who is speaking — something that is often more difficult in person. But, in the case of people who use ASL, we’ve heard that it can be difficult to be in a virtual meeting and simultaneously see their interpreter and the person speaking to them.Multi-pin, a new feature in Google Meet, helps solve this. Now you can pin multiple video tiles at once, for example, the presenter’s screen and the interpreter’s screen. And like many accessibility features, the usefulness extends beyond people with disabilities. The next time someone is watching a panel and wants to pin multiple people to the screen, this feature makes that possible.We've also been working to make video content more accessible to those who are blind or low-vision through audio descriptions that describe verbally what is on the screen visually. All of our English language YouTube Originals content from the past year — and moving forward — will now have English audio descriptions available globally. To turn on the audio description track, at the bottom right of the video player, click on “Settings”, select “Audio track”, and choose “English descriptive”.For many people with speech impairments, being understood by the technology that powers tools like voice typing or virtual assistants can be difficult. In 2019, we started work to change that through Project Euphonia, a research initiative that works with community organizations and people with speech impairments to create more inclusive speech recognition models. Today, we’re expanding Project Euphonia’s research to include four more languages: French, Hindi, Japanese and Spanish. With this expansion, we can create even more helpful technology for more people — no matter where they are or what language they speak.I’ve learned so much in my time working in this space and among the things I’ve learned is the absolute importance of building right alongside the very people who will most use these tools in the end. We’ll continue to do that as we work to create a more inclusive and accessible world, both physically and digitally.
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Helping every student learn how they learn best
Big Data Diversity, Equity and Inclusion

Helping every student learn how they learn best

Editor’s note: Today is Global Accessibility Awareness Day. We’re also sharing how we’re partnering with people with disabilitiesto build products and a newAndroid accessibility feature.I often think about what Laura Allen, a Googler who leads our accessibility and disability inclusion work and is low vision, shared with me about her experience growing up using assistive technology in school. She said: “Technology should help children learn the way they need to learn, it shouldn’t be a thing that makes them feel different in the classroom.”As someone who has spent years building technology at Google, I’ve thought a lot about how we can create the best possible experience for everyone. A big part of getting that right is building accessibility right into our products — which is especially important when it comes to technology that helps students learn. Ninety-five percent of students who have disabilities attend traditional schools, but the majority of those classrooms lack resources to support their needs. The need for accessible learning experiences only intensifies with the recent rise of blended learning environments.Teacher working with a student on a ChromebookAn educator works 1:1 with a studentA teacher sitting with a student with intellectual disabilities. The teacher's cane is leaning on the table nearby.An educator sits with a student working on a Chromebook.One autistic student and one student with Downs Syndrome working together in classroom on a ChromebookStudents in their special education class working together in their classroomWe want students to have the tools they need to express themselves and access information in a way that works best for them. Here are a few recent ways we’ve built accessibility features directly into our education tools.You can now add alt-text in Gmail. This allows people to add context for an image, making it accessible for people using screen readers and helping them better understand exactly what is being shared.We’ve improved our Google Docs experience with braille support. With comments and highlights in braille, students reading a Google Doc will now hear start and end indications for comments and highlights alongside the rest of the text. This change makes it easier for people using screen readers and refreshable braille displays to interact with comments in documents and identify text with background colors.Video format not supportedWe added new features to dictation on Chrome OS. Now you canspeak into any text field on the Chromebook simply by clicking on the mic icon in the status area or pressing Search + d to dictate. The dictation feature can be helpful for students who have trouble writing — whether that's because of dysgraphia, having a motor disability or something else. You can also edit using just your voice. Simply say “new line” to move the cursor to another line, “help” to see the full list of commands, or “undo” to fix any typos or mistakes.Video format not supportedAccessibility in actionWe see the helpfulness of these features when they’re in the hands of teachers and students. My team recently spoke with Tracey Green, a teacher of the Deaf and an Itinerant Educational Specialist from the Montreal Oral School for the Deaf (MOSD) in Quebec. Her job is to work with students with hearing loss who attend local schools.She and Chris Webb, who is a teacher at John Rennie High School and also a Google for Education Certified Innovator and Trainer, have been using Google Classroom to support students throughout distance learning and those who have returned to the classroom. For example, they integrate YouTube videos with automatic captioning and rely on captions in Google Meet. Their efforts to improve access to information during school assemblies kicked off a school-wide, student-led accessibility initiative to raise awareness about hearing loss and related accessibility issues.Benefiting everyoneOne phenomenon that underscores how disability-first features benefit everyone is called the “Curb-cut Effect.” When curbs were flattened to allow access for people with disabilities, it also meant greater access for bikers, skateboarders, and people pushing strollers or shopping carts. Everyone benefitted. Similarly, accessibility improvements like these recent updates to our education tools mean a better experience for everyone.We see this similar effect time and time again among our own products. Take Live Caption in the Chrome browser for example. Similar to Google Meet captions, Live Caption in Chrome captions any video and audio content on your browser, which can be especially helpful for students who are deaf or hard of hearing. It can also be helpful when people want to read content without noise so they don’t disrupt the people around them.When we build accessible products, we build for everyone. It’s one of the things I love about working for Google — that we serve the world. There’s a lot of work ahead of us to make sure our products delight all people, with and without disabilities. I’m excited and humbled by technology’s potential to help get us closer to this future.Stay up-to-date on the latest accessibility features from Google for Education.
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Earn more from your video streams through automation
Big Data

Earn more from your video streams through automation

What if managing your video streaming business didn’t have to be so complex? What if your team didn’t have to dig through data across devices, apps, live streams and video on-demand to find insights?We’ve built new solutions in Ad Manager to simplify these processes and save publishers time — helping you automatically uncover new opportunities, manage all your video streams with flexibility and ultimately grow your video revenue.Automatically uncover new insightsAd Manager already provides video-specific tools and time-based metrics to help you understand the true potential of every commercial break. But making sense of your video reporting data and finding insights for your business can be a challenging, manual task.Our new Programmatic Video Health Tools save time by highlighting opportunities you may have missed, right when you log into your account. These granular insights can help you determine why some inventory performs better than others at auction.The programmatic video signals card automatically generates a snapshot of how your video inventory is performing. It shows signals that are important to advertisers, such as viewability, app or web domain name and audience information — plus their impact on revenue. These three dimensions make it easier for advertisers to value your inventory and can help you grow your revenue by identifying where these metrics can improve. Globally, publishers with high programmatic inventory signal coverage see an average 25% revenue uplift compared to inventory with low programmatic inventory signal coverage.[be2de3]We’ve heard from publishers that error reporting for lost ad requests (that can directly impact revenue) requires a lot of manual tasks across multiple video-specific reports. With the Video Ad Serving Template (VAST) errors insights card, Ad Manager uses automation to quickly show you the number of errors on your inventory and which line items are causing the errors, so you don’t have to spend time running a custom report.You can even sort the list of line items to find errors with the highest impact on revenue. By surfacing these actionable error insights early, the VAST error insights card can help you increase revenue by fixing misconfigured settings or broken creatives.Lastly, because we know every publisher has unique business needs, we’ll release a Video Performance Alerts solution to beta to help you automate insights based on specific requirements. With Video Performance Alerts, you’ll be able to create customized email alerts for your choice of campaign metrics and dimensions. For example, you can create an alert for when total impressions across a line item drops below an expected daily threshold. So instead of constantly logging in to check on campaign performance, you’ll get notified automatically.Identify and fix problems faster with new reporting toolsQuickly finding a problem will help you resolve it sooner and earn more revenue. This is especially important during traffic spikes from large audiences tuning into new episodes or live events. So we created real-time video reporting to help you quickly get the information you need.With real-time video reporting, we’ve improved historical ad serving data availability by 10x, shortening the time to access performance data to under two minutes — so you can get ad unit or line item level data to find and fix errors before the next commercial break. Keep an eye out for new solutions over the coming quarters to help you identify and solve issues in real time.For publishers serving ads to their content on YouTube with Ad Manager, we’ve launched a new troubleshooting tool to open beta. With the YouTube ads delivery tool, you can test ad delivery on YouTube inventory. It lets you see data like ad requests, key-values and details for the winning line items to help you validate and fix issues. To make sure everything is behaving and delivering as expected, you can even test line items and simulate requests.Supporting your video streaming growthWe hope these new automated solutions and faster reporting tools give you the time and space to focus on growing your business. Look out for more updates this year to help you improve troubleshooting, test your set up and find more insights.
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Big Data

Stripe launches Data Pipeline to help users sync payments data with Redshift and Snowflake

Stripe today announced Data Pipeline, a new way for customers to synchronize their financial data with Amazon Redshift and Snowflake.
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Big Data

UiPath Partners with Adobe to Automate End-to-End Digital Document Processes and Workflows

UiPath (NYSE: PATH), a leading enterprise automation software company, announced it has integrated its automation platform with digital document generation and e-signature capabilities from Adobe (NASDAQ: ADBE). By integrating with Adobe Document Services and Adobe Acrobat Sign to help customers automate end-to-end document processes, UiPath can boost employee productivity, enhance digital customer experiences, and lower costs through seamless, uninterrupted digital document workflows.
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Big Data

Emza and Alif Demonstrate Fast, Ultra-Efficient Object Detection for Tiny AI Edge Devices

Emza Visual Sense, a pioneer in Tiny AI visual sensing, is joining with Alif Semiconductor to show how the combination of powerful, highly efficient Arm®-based hardware and optimized models can make AI a reality at the edge. The companies are demonstrating Emza’s trained face detection model running on Alif’s Ensemble™ microcontroller (MCU), the first MCU featuring the Arm Ethos™-U55 microNPU. The Emza model runs an order of magnitude faster on the Ensemble device with Ethos-U55 compared to a CPU-only solution, with extremely low power consumption.
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Big Data Women in Tech

The Women in AI Breakfast is a go, and nominations for the Women in AI Awards now open

VentureBeat is committed to shining a light on the glaring gender equity gap in the data and AI workforce.
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Fostering inclusive spaces through Disability Alliance
Big Data Diversity, Equity and Inclusion

Fostering inclusive spaces through Disability Alliance

I was 2 when my parents discovered I had polio, which impacted my ability to stand and walk. Growing up in China, I still remember the challenges I faced when I wanted to go to college. Back then, all potential candidates had to pass a physical test, which posed a challenge. Knowing this, my parents, my teachers and even the local government advocated for me. Thanks to their support, I was granted an exception to attend college, where I graduated with a degree in computer science.When I joined Google in Shanghai in 2011, the real estate team was working to open a new office space. I was part of the planning process to ensure we designed an inclusive workspace, especially for individuals with physical disabilities. When I discovered the desks at the office were too high, or if the meeting space was not designed wide enough for someone in a wheelchair to enter, I worked with the team to solve the problem. I also suggested building wheelchair-accessible restrooms when they were not available on the floor I was working on.These experiences showed me everyone has the voice to drive change — including myself. I decided to co-lead our Disability Alliance (DA), one of Google’s resource groups in China, with other passionate Googlers. We wanted to create a space to help address challenges Googlers with disabilities face, and build allyship among the wider Google community. We also wanted to create a platform to increase awareness of different forms of disabilities. For example, some people don't think about invisible disabilities, but it's equally important to build awareness of disabilities you might not immediately see. I'm incredibly excited to see how we continue to grow our community in the coming year across China.Having a disability doesn't limit me, and I've been fortunate to be surrounded by people who value my abilities instead of my disability. Over the years, I've achieved my goals and dreams from leading an incredible team of 50 at Google, taking on physical activities such as skiing and marathons, and driving change for the broader disability community.I was ready to compete in a marathon in China back in 2021As we commemorate Global Accessibility Awareness Day, I also spoke to Sakiko, a fellow member of our Disability Alliance chapter in Japan, to learn more about what drives her, and why it’s important that we provide equal opportunities for all.Sharing my personal experience at an external event. I’m seated at the extreme right in a gray sweater.Tell us more about yourself. What keeps you going at Google after more than nine years?I was born with spina bifida, and I move around with crutches. I’ve always wanted to work in sales, but when I was job hunting, I was turned down by several companies because of my disabilities. I knew I had the ability and knowledge to sell, and I enjoy interacting with people, so I didn’t give up. When I interviewed at Google, the interviewers focused on my potential and abilities, and not my disability. That surprised me, because I’ve never experienced that. I recalled asking one of my interviewers if my disability would impede this opportunity, but he said, “if you have the ability to sell, it shouldn’t stop you from doing that.” It was amazing and encouraging to hear that. I currently work in the Google Ads team and have experienced various roles. When my clients shared how grateful and thankful they are for my dedicated support, that really keeps me going.What is a memorable experience you’ve had with the Disability Alliance?I once hosted a workshop where we invited students with disabilities to have hands-on experience coding their own web application, giving them the confidence to pursue their interest in engineering. At the end of the event, several parents shared that they didn’t know their children had the potential to code and create applications all by themselves. I still remember this day vividly, because it demonstrates everyone has the chance to shine when they are given the right opportunities to learn and develop new skills.
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Big Data

Seclore accelerates focus to lead in enterprise data security

Seclore, a data-centric security platform for enterprises, today announced a $27 million series C funding which will help it to accelerate its goal to become the platform of choice for enterprise data protection initiatives.
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Big Data

Next-Generation of Tableau Brings Advanced Analytics and Automated Insights to Business Users

oday, at the annual Tableau Conference, Salesforce introduced Tableau Cloud, the fast and easy way for customers to get the full value of Tableau at enterprise scale. The offering is the next generation of what was formerly known as Tableau Online and includes several new innovations to deliver intelligent, powerful and easy-to-use analytical tools to help anyone uncover insights, confidently make data-driven decisions, and create a single source of truth for all trusted data, accessible anytime, anywhere.
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WIT Board Member, Monika Mueller lands position at Softensity Inc!
Big Data Women in Tech

WIT Board Member, Monika Mueller lands position at Softensity Inc!

WIT Board Member, Monika Mueller, lands a new position at Softensity Inc! Join us in congratulation WIT Board Member, Monika Mueller on her new position as Executive Vice President of Consulting Services & Head of Latin America at Softensity Inc!
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Big Data

Predictions for the Future of Low-Code Automation

In this contributed article, Palak Kadakia, VP of Product Management at UiPath, discusses the future of low code automation. The increasing ubiquity of automation within modern enterprises is paving the way for a new, technology-infused world of work. However, to capitalize on that trend and become fully automated enterprises, organizations need to supply employees, even the non-technical ones, with the tools and training needed to ensure automation is at the fingertips of every person.
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Building a secure world
Information Security

Building a secure world

The following is adapted from remarks delivered by Royal Hansen, Vice President of Engineering for Privacy, Safety and Security during his keynote United in Cyberpower: The Role of Companies in Building a Cybersecure World at Cybersec Europe 2022 in Katowice, Poland.I believe cybersecurity is one of the top issues facing the world today and I’d like to share a bit about why it’s so important for companies, countries, and communities of all sizes to work together.This is particularly true right here in Central and Eastern Europe where the Russian invasion of Ukraine has brought these issues into sharp focus. I’m honored to be here today and to get to meet with so many of you who are working on this day in and day out.As governments in this region and elsewhere in the world tackle this issue we want to ensure we are doing everything we can to support those efforts. Google’s mission has always been about organizing the world's information and making it universally accessible and useful. The work we’re doing to ensure people can get access to quality information–and do so safely–has never been more important than it is today.Securing users in Ukraine and the broader regionAs the Russian invasion of Ukraine unfolded, Google mobilized to help the people of Ukraine and protect the security of our users and services – an area where we are uniquely positioned to help in this conflict.We have our own specialized teams dedicated to identifying, tracking, and countering threats from government-backed actors.Russia-backed hacking and influence operations are not new to us; we’ve been tracking and taking action against them for years. To put this into perspective, we’ve seen and worked to disrupt Russian operations targeting the U.S. elections in 2016 and 2017 and campaigns targeting the 2018 Olympic games. In October, we blocked a Russian campaign targeting 14,000 Google users.And we’ve seen first hand the targeting of Ukraine by Russia. It has been ongoing for years with both espionage and occasional cyber attacks tracked by our teams. As the war intensified, we also saw Russian threat actors shift focus to targets elsewhere in Eastern Europe.Our Threat Analysis Group (TAG), regularly publishes details on campaigns it detects, and disrupts these efforts to help governments and private sector companies better defend their systems.We’ve seen threat actors beyond Russia shift their focus and targeting, including a growing number of threat actors using the war as a lure in phishing and malware campaigns. This includes government-backed actors from China, Iran, North Korea, Belarus and financially-motivated, criminal actors using current events as a means for targeting users.For example, we’ve seen one cyber crime group impersonating military personnel to extort money for rescuing relatives in Ukraine.In addition to disrupting threats, we are doing everything we can to increase protections for high risk users and organizations in Ukraine. We’ve redoubled our efforts to offer free tools to help – including protecting hundreds of high risk users on the ground with our Advanced Protection Program, and expanding eligibility of Project Shield to include the Ukraine government. Shield is currently protecting over 200 websites in Ukraine from distributed denial of service attacks.It is in this spirit of action that we are expanding our partnerships and investment in the broader region on cybersecurity.In fact, this week a delegation of our top security engineers and leaders are on the ground across Eastern Europe to provide hands-on training to high risk groups, deliver security keys and support local businesses as they look to improve their security posture.To share what we know about the threat, we are engaging in technical exchanges with governments in the region.We’re providing free tools and expertise to democratic institutions and civil society, such as the Protect Your Democracy Toolkit - which we launched today in partnership with our Jigsaw team.We’re also investing in, and shaping, the next generation of cybersecurity professionals. For example, Google has committed to provide scholarships for 150,000 people in Europe, the Middle East and Africa through the new Google Career Certificate training.We’re also helping governments and businesses stay ahead of the threat, including helping government agencies, companies and utilities who rely on outdated hardware and software to replace old systems with better foundations and we are here to build up businesses and governments’ confidence to embrace digital transformation securely.Google’s approach to securityWe believe we are uniquely positioned to help users, organizations, and governments in this region because of our approach to security.First, we focus on the basics. We bake in security from the beginning instead of bolting it on as an afterthought and we design helpful products that are secure by default for our users. In fact, we are the first consumer tech company to automatically turn on 2 step verification, our version of multifactor authentication, or MFA, for our users. We recommend businesses and governments focus on these fundamentals as well.Second, we take an open and interoperable approach to security, and we invest to ensure this model of the Internet as a whole is protected. In today’s interconnected environment, our collective security is only as strong as the weakest link. Our business cannot thrive if people don’t feel safe online. That’s why we design solutions that eliminate entire classes of threats from being effective both on our platforms, and across the Internet as a whole.Finally, and perhaps most importantly – we are looking at the future of cybersecurity and investing in advanced, state-of-the-art capabilities. We know that cyber threats evolve quickly – as soon as a new technology is introduced or adopted, there are threat actors and cyber criminals looking for ways to exploit it. That’s why it’s not enough to just stay a few steps ahead of the threat.We need to invest in the future of technology, from cutting-edge artificial intelligence capabilities, to advanced cryptography, to quantum computing – our teams are already working on the future of cybersecurity. And we see it as part of our mission to ensure that we open source and share these findings so that organizations and governments can stay ahead of the latest cyber threats.Security-proofing our tech policiesOur approach enables us to weather online security threats. But advanced capabilities are not enough if government policies inadvertently undermine our ability to protect users.I support smart tech regulation, which can fuel the vitality of the Internet and ensure technology is meeting society's needs. Unfortunately, some technology regulation is not adequately considering the impact to safety and security efforts online.For example, some policies seek to limit sharing of data between different services on platforms’ like ours, but overly-broad bans on cross-platform data sharing also have significant implications for the threat intelligence work I mentioned earlier.The ability to share intelligence on threat actors and their technical signatures helps identify and stop the work of threat actors and cybercriminals. It protects not just one company or two companies, but the Internet as a whole.To realize the full benefits of technology to society, society must be able to trust that the technology they are using is safe and secure. By ensuring security has a seat at the table in these policy discussions, we can strike this balance and unlock technology’s full potential. Today’s conflict and challenges point to a need for better cooperation and giving technical experts a seat at the table in these policy discussions.We applaud the Declaration for the Future of the Internet, which calls on governments and industry to protect a future for the Internet that is open, free, global, interoperable, reliable, and secure.At our core, Google is an Internet company, and our fate is tied to the Internet remaining true to these principles. The internet itself is a multi-stakeholder system, and protecting users and citizens online requires cooperation among us, governments and businesses.It’s never been more urgent, and our ability to make a difference is greater than anyone anticipated. We all must work together to protect this future, whether that means combating cyber threats, building safe technologies that unlock society’s full potential, or developing responsible technology policies.We stand ready to partner with governments, businesses, and individual users to see this future secured.
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Step into the Meroë pyramids with Google
Diversity, Equity and Inclusion

Step into the Meroë pyramids with Google

When you think of pyramids does your mind wander to the Pyramids of Giza in Egypt or the Mayan Temples of Guatemala? Great civilizations built each of these pyramids and inscribed their stories onto the walls of them, offering glimpses into their daily life.The Pyramids of Meroë in Sudan, while lesser known, are no different. Today, you can explore these stunning pyramids, which are a UNESCO World Heritage site, on Google Arts & Culture.Over 200 pyramids were constructed in Meroë, the third and final capital of the Kushite Kingdom, an ancient African civilization that ruled the lands of Nubia for over 3000 years. Now you can take a virtual walk through the Pyramids of Meroë and explore the inscriptions using Street View’s panoramic imagery. You can also learn more about the Kushite Kingdom, their royalty and the architecture behind the pyramids in an immersive web experience that’s available in a range of languages including Arabic, English, French, German and Spanish.A user searches Google for the pyramids of meroe, then places an Augmented Reality model in front of themSearch for “pyramids of meroe” to explore a pyramid up close in Augmented RealityA series of pyramids are arranged in two rowsUncover the story of Meroë at g.co/meroeA user pans along the outline of a pyramid in Street ViewExplore these remarkable Nubian pyramids on Street ViewA series of steep pyramids extends across the horizon.Sudan’s Pyramids of MeroëIf you want to get even more up close and personal, you can visualize the pyramids using augmented reality — no matter where you are. You can also listen to acclaimed Sudanese-American poet Emi Mahmood share evocative rhymes that are a beautiful ode to her homeland and to this project that shares Sudan’s rich heritage with others.We’ve also partnered with the United Nations Economic and Social Council (UNESCO) to bring you more information about Meroë, Gebel Barkal and Napatan region and Sudan’s Sanganeb Marine National Park.
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Big Data

The Metamorphosis of Data Governance: What it Means Today

In this contributed article, editorial consultant Jelani Harper highlights how despite changing definitions, a more profound—and deceptively subtle—transformation has almost silently wrought data governance into something markedly different than what it was as little as even five years ago.
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Big Data

What’s so Important about Data Quality?

In this special guest feature, David Kolinek, Vice President of Product, Ataccama, asks why data quality is so important? Sometimes taking a step back and reviewing the basics can help clear things up. DQ is not a single activity but a series of actions that draw upon multiple resources and functions, all focused on making data usable in a purposeful way. It falls under data management, which has an overriding mission of delivering a view of datasets from various perspectives, enabling the type and quality level of data to be assessed. 
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Big Data

Predibase Introduces a New Way to Do Low-Code Machine Learning

Predibase emerged from stealth with its commercial platform that lets both data scientists and non-experts develop flexible, state-of-the-art ML with best-of-breed ML infrastructure. Predibase has been in beta with Fortune 500 enterprises the last nine months who have seen time for model development deployment drop from months to days and used by data practitioners and engineers across each organization. 
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Seniors search what they see, using a new Lens
Big Data Diversity, Equity and Inclusion

Seniors search what they see, using a new Lens

Technology shines when it helps us get things done in our daily lives, and that’s exactly why a group of around 100 very eager seniors gathered in Odense, Denmark. All older than 65, many up to 85, they decided to stay on top of the latest technological tricks and tools. On this March day, the eye-opener was the often overlooked potential in searching for information using visual tools, like Google Lens.So now the seniors searched their surroundings directly: Scanned trees, plants, animals and buildings, used Translate to get hold of Turkish language menu cards or Japanese sayings, and found product declarations through barcode scanning.The group was taking part in a training set up by Faglige Seniorer, which organizes 300,000 seniors in total. They first partnered with Google back in 2019 to train seniors in using voice to search, and now the time had come to use live images.A room full of people seated at large tables listening to a woman speak.Around 100 seniors gathered in Odense, Denmark to learn more about Google Lens.Two older people looking at cell phones near models of birds.Participants used smartphones to scan images of animals like birds.An older person stands next to a model of a bird.The group was taking part in a training set up by Faglige Seniorer, which organizes 300,000 seniors in total.“Often, when I go for a walk, I stumble upon an unknown flower or a tree. Now I can just take a picture to discover what kind of plant I am standing before,” Verner Madsen, one of the participants, remarked. “I don’t need to bring my encyclopedia. It is really smart and helpful.”Seniors in a country like Denmark are generally very tech savvy, but with digitization constantly advancing — accelerating even faster during two years of COVID-19 — some seniors risk being left behind, creating gaps between generations. During worldwide lockdowns, technological tools have helped seniors stay connected with their family and friends, and smartphone features have helped improve everyday life. One key element of that is delivering accurate and useful information when needed. And for that, typed words on a smartphone keyboard can often be substituted with a visual search, using a single tap on the screen.Being able to "search what you see" in this way was an eye-opener to many. As the day ended, another avid participant, Henrik Rasmussen, declared he was heading straight home to continue his practice.“I thought I was up to speed on digital developments, but after today I realize that I still have a lot to learn and discover,” he said.
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